You are here

Welcome from Academic Dean

Array
(
    [metatags] => Array
        (
            [title] => Array
                (
                    [#attached] => Array
                        (
                            [metatag_set_preprocess_variable] => Array
                                (
                                    [0] => Array
                                        (
                                            [0] => html
                                            [1] => head_title
                                            [2] => Welcome from Academic Dean | Scattergood Friends School
                                        )

                                    [1] => Array
                                        (
                                            [0] => html
                                            [1] => head_array
                                            [2] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [title] => Welcome from Academic Dean | Scattergood Friends School
                                                )

                                        )

                                )

                        )

                    [#children] => 
                    [#printed] => 1
                )

            [description] => Array
                (
                )

            [generator] => Array
                (
                    [#attached] => Array
                        (
                            [drupal_add_html_head] => Array
                                (
                                    [0] => Array
                                        (
                                            [0] => Array
                                                (
                                                    [#id] => system_meta_generator
                                                    [#theme] => metatag
                                                    [#tag] => meta
                                                    [#name] => generator
                                                    [#value] => Drupal 7 (http://drupal.org)
                                                    [#attached] => Array
                                                        (
                                                            [drupal_add_http_header] => Array
                                                                (
                                                                    [0] => Array
                                                                        (
                                                                            [0] => X-Generator
                                                                            [1] => Drupal 7 (http://drupal.org)
                                                                        )

                                                                )

                                                        )

                                                )

                                            [1] => system_meta_generator
                                        )

                                )

                        )

                    [#children] => 
                    [#printed] => 1
                )

            [#field_type] => 
            [#printed] => 1
            [#children] => 
        )

    [body] => Array
        (
            [#theme] => field
            [#weight] => 0
            [#title] => Body
            [#access] => 1
            [#label_display] => hidden
            [#view_mode] => full
            [#language] => und
            [#field_name] => body
            [#field_type] => text_with_summary
            [#field_translatable] => 0
            [#entity_type] => node
            [#bundle] => scattergood_template
            [#object] => stdClass Object
                (
                    [vid] => 32
                    [uid] => 2
                    [title] => Welcome from Academic Dean
                    [log] => 
                    [status] => 1
                    [comment] => 0
                    [promote] => 1
                    [sticky] => 0
                    [nid] => 27
                    [type] => scattergood_template
                    [language] => und
                    [created] => 1318097557
                    [changed] => 1383707576
                    [tnid] => 0
                    [translate] => 0
                    [revision_timestamp] => 1383707576
                    [revision_uid] => 4
                    [body] => Array
                        (
                            [und] => Array
                                (
                                    [0] => Array
                                        (
                                            [value] => 
When I first came to Scattergood Friends School, I wanted to talk with every faculty member. From my first moment on campus, I instantly knew that Scattergood had a  magical quality that would be difficult to define. However, through my discussions with Scattergood teachers I have come close. 
 
Hans Niehus has been teaching at Scattergood for over 25 years. In his time here, he has developed a mix of courses that students clamor to take. Some classes (such as his Logic and Critical Thinking course) have obvious real-world applications. These courses represent the pinnacle of teaching and learning and offer an answer to students and parents when they exclaim, “why can’t schools stop teaching to the test and show our children how to think?” 
 
However, I was struck by Hans’s other course offerings of fencing and juggling. When I met with Hans, I asked him about these classes. Why would juggling be important to know? His answer was remarkable. He said that his class was not about teaching juggling. “Who needs to know how to juggle?” he exclaimed. Rather this class was about teaching qualities such as resiliency and grit. 
 
For decades our small school in Iowa has been intentionally teaching grit and resiliency. These are the same qualities about which Ivy League scholars such as Angela Duckworth have recently given TED talks and written articles. 

I left that meeting feeling inspired and began to share my enthusiasm with the rest of the faculty. I was still left with the question: “why juggling?” Then I learned of Scattergood alum, John Connell. John was a student in Hans’ juggling course. While traveling around Bolivia, he followed the example of local street performers and began to use his juggling skills to support himself. In 2006, John began teaching juggling to disadvantaged Bolivian youth, improving their skill sets and providing them with greater economic opportunities. 
 
The power of a Scattergood education comes from providing students with opportunities to explore areas of interest while teaching transferable skills. Most students who leave Scattergood will not go on to start non-profit juggling schools. However, they will learn the skills necessary to persevere through challenges and the sensibilities to use their talents and knowledge to help others. 
 
I invite you to visit our school and see the difference a Scattergood education can make.

Louis Herbst
[summary] => [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>
When I first came to Scattergood Friends School, I wanted to talk with every faculty member. From my first moment on campus, I instantly knew that Scattergood had a  magical quality that would be difficult to define. However, through my discussions with Scattergood teachers I have come close. 
 
Hans Niehus has been teaching at Scattergood for over 25 years. In his time here, he has developed a mix of courses that students clamor to take. Some classes (such as his Logic and Critical Thinking course) have obvious real-world applications. These courses represent the pinnacle of teaching and learning and offer an answer to students and parents when they exclaim, “why can’t schools stop teaching to the test and show our children how to think?” 
 
However, I was struck by Hans’s other course offerings of fencing and juggling. When I met with Hans, I asked him about these classes. Why would juggling be important to know? His answer was remarkable. He said that his class was not about teaching juggling. “Who needs to know how to juggle?” he exclaimed. Rather this class was about teaching qualities such as resiliency and grit. 
 
For decades our small school in Iowa has been intentionally teaching grit and resiliency. These are the same qualities about which Ivy League scholars such as Angela Duckworth have recently given TED talks and written articles. 

I left that meeting feeling inspired and began to share my enthusiasm with the rest of the faculty. I was still left with the question: “why juggling?” Then I learned of Scattergood alum, John Connell. John was a student in Hans’ juggling course. While traveling around Bolivia, he followed the example of local street performers and began to use his juggling skills to support himself. In 2006, John began teaching juggling to disadvantaged Bolivian youth, improving their skill sets and providing them with greater economic opportunities. 
 
The power of a Scattergood education comes from providing students with opportunities to explore areas of interest while teaching transferable skills. Most students who leave Scattergood will not go on to start non-profit juggling schools. However, they will learn the skills necessary to persevere through challenges and the sensibilities to use their talents and knowledge to help others. 
 
I invite you to visit our school and see the difference a Scattergood education can make.

Louis Herbst
[safe_summary] => ) ) ) [field_bullet_list] => Array ( ) [field_image_video_top] => Array ( ) [field_image_bottom] => Array ( ) [field_image_video_right] => Array ( [und] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [fid] => 578 [title] => [data] => [file] => stdClass Object ( [fid] => 578 [uid] => 10 [filename] => Louis pic.jpg [uri] => public://null/Louis pic_0.jpg [filemime] => image/jpeg [filesize] => 33847 [status] => 1 [timestamp] => 1373297766 [type] => image [metatags] => Array ( ) [rdf_mapping] => Array ( ) [entity_view_prepared] => 1 ) ) ) ) [field_pdf] => Array ( ) [field_image_video_top_large] => Array ( ) [field_image_bottom_large] => Array ( ) [field_image_video_right_bottom] => Array ( ) [field_image_video_right_middle] => Array ( ) [metatags] => Array ( ) [rdf_mapping] => Array ( [rdftype] => Array ( [0] => sioc:Item [1] => foaf:Document ) [title] => Array ( [predicates] => Array ( [0] => dc:title ) ) [created] => Array ( [predicates] => Array ( [0] => dc:date [1] => dc:created ) [datatype] => xsd:dateTime [callback] => date_iso8601 ) [changed] => Array ( [predicates] => Array ( [0] => dc:modified ) [datatype] => xsd:dateTime [callback] => date_iso8601 ) [body] => Array ( [predicates] => Array ( [0] => content:encoded ) ) [uid] => Array ( [predicates] => Array ( [0] => sioc:has_creator ) [type] => rel ) [name] => Array ( [predicates] => Array ( [0] => foaf:name ) ) [comment_count] => Array ( [predicates] => Array ( [0] => sioc:num_replies ) [datatype] => xsd:integer ) [last_activity] => Array ( [predicates] => Array ( [0] => sioc:last_activity_date ) [datatype] => xsd:dateTime [callback] => date_iso8601 ) ) [name] => avi_admin [picture] => 0 [data] => b:0; [entity_view_prepared] => 1 ) [#items] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [value] =>
When I first came to Scattergood Friends School, I wanted to talk with every faculty member. From my first moment on campus, I instantly knew that Scattergood had a  magical quality that would be difficult to define. However, through my discussions with Scattergood teachers I have come close. 
 
Hans Niehus has been teaching at Scattergood for over 25 years. In his time here, he has developed a mix of courses that students clamor to take. Some classes (such as his Logic and Critical Thinking course) have obvious real-world applications. These courses represent the pinnacle of teaching and learning and offer an answer to students and parents when they exclaim, “why can’t schools stop teaching to the test and show our children how to think?” 
 
However, I was struck by Hans’s other course offerings of fencing and juggling. When I met with Hans, I asked him about these classes. Why would juggling be important to know? His answer was remarkable. He said that his class was not about teaching juggling. “Who needs to know how to juggle?” he exclaimed. Rather this class was about teaching qualities such as resiliency and grit. 
 
For decades our small school in Iowa has been intentionally teaching grit and resiliency. These are the same qualities about which Ivy League scholars such as Angela Duckworth have recently given TED talks and written articles. 

I left that meeting feeling inspired and began to share my enthusiasm with the rest of the faculty. I was still left with the question: “why juggling?” Then I learned of Scattergood alum, John Connell. John was a student in Hans’ juggling course. While traveling around Bolivia, he followed the example of local street performers and began to use his juggling skills to support himself. In 2006, John began teaching juggling to disadvantaged Bolivian youth, improving their skill sets and providing them with greater economic opportunities. 
 
The power of a Scattergood education comes from providing students with opportunities to explore areas of interest while teaching transferable skills. Most students who leave Scattergood will not go on to start non-profit juggling schools. However, they will learn the skills necessary to persevere through challenges and the sensibilities to use their talents and knowledge to help others. 
 
I invite you to visit our school and see the difference a Scattergood education can make.

Louis Herbst
[summary] => [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>
When I first came to Scattergood Friends School, I wanted to talk with every faculty member. From my first moment on campus, I instantly knew that Scattergood had a  magical quality that would be difficult to define. However, through my discussions with Scattergood teachers I have come close. 
 
Hans Niehus has been teaching at Scattergood for over 25 years. In his time here, he has developed a mix of courses that students clamor to take. Some classes (such as his Logic and Critical Thinking course) have obvious real-world applications. These courses represent the pinnacle of teaching and learning and offer an answer to students and parents when they exclaim, “why can’t schools stop teaching to the test and show our children how to think?” 
 
However, I was struck by Hans’s other course offerings of fencing and juggling. When I met with Hans, I asked him about these classes. Why would juggling be important to know? His answer was remarkable. He said that his class was not about teaching juggling. “Who needs to know how to juggle?” he exclaimed. Rather this class was about teaching qualities such as resiliency and grit. 
 
For decades our small school in Iowa has been intentionally teaching grit and resiliency. These are the same qualities about which Ivy League scholars such as Angela Duckworth have recently given TED talks and written articles. 

I left that meeting feeling inspired and began to share my enthusiasm with the rest of the faculty. I was still left with the question: “why juggling?” Then I learned of Scattergood alum, John Connell. John was a student in Hans’ juggling course. While traveling around Bolivia, he followed the example of local street performers and began to use his juggling skills to support himself. In 2006, John began teaching juggling to disadvantaged Bolivian youth, improving their skill sets and providing them with greater economic opportunities. 
 
The power of a Scattergood education comes from providing students with opportunities to explore areas of interest while teaching transferable skills. Most students who leave Scattergood will not go on to start non-profit juggling schools. However, they will learn the skills necessary to persevere through challenges and the sensibilities to use their talents and knowledge to help others. 
 
I invite you to visit our school and see the difference a Scattergood education can make.

Louis Herbst
[safe_summary] => ) ) [#formatter] => text_default [0] => Array ( [#markup] =>
When I first came to Scattergood Friends School, I wanted to talk with every faculty member. From my first moment on campus, I instantly knew that Scattergood had a  magical quality that would be difficult to define. However, through my discussions with Scattergood teachers I have come close. 
 
Hans Niehus has been teaching at Scattergood for over 25 years. In his time here, he has developed a mix of courses that students clamor to take. Some classes (such as his Logic and Critical Thinking course) have obvious real-world applications. These courses represent the pinnacle of teaching and learning and offer an answer to students and parents when they exclaim, “why can’t schools stop teaching to the test and show our children how to think?” 
 
However, I was struck by Hans’s other course offerings of fencing and juggling. When I met with Hans, I asked him about these classes. Why would juggling be important to know? His answer was remarkable. He said that his class was not about teaching juggling. “Who needs to know how to juggle?” he exclaimed. Rather this class was about teaching qualities such as resiliency and grit. 
 
For decades our small school in Iowa has been intentionally teaching grit and resiliency. These are the same qualities about which Ivy League scholars such as Angela Duckworth have recently given TED talks and written articles. 

I left that meeting feeling inspired and began to share my enthusiasm with the rest of the faculty. I was still left with the question: “why juggling?” Then I learned of Scattergood alum, John Connell. John was a student in Hans’ juggling course. While traveling around Bolivia, he followed the example of local street performers and began to use his juggling skills to support himself. In 2006, John began teaching juggling to disadvantaged Bolivian youth, improving their skill sets and providing them with greater economic opportunities. 
 
The power of a Scattergood education comes from providing students with opportunities to explore areas of interest while teaching transferable skills. Most students who leave Scattergood will not go on to start non-profit juggling schools. However, they will learn the skills necessary to persevere through challenges and the sensibilities to use their talents and knowledge to help others. 
 
I invite you to visit our school and see the difference a Scattergood education can make.

Louis Herbst
) ) [links] => Array ( [#theme] => links__node [#pre_render] => Array ( [0] => drupal_pre_render_links ) [#attributes] => Array ( [class] => Array ( [0] => links [1] => inline ) ) [node] => Array ( [#theme] => links__node__node [#links] => Array ( ) [#attributes] => Array ( [class] => Array ( [0] => links [1] => inline ) ) ) ) [field_image_video_right] => Array ( [#theme] => field [#weight] => 8 [#title] => Image/Video (Right Top) [#access] => 1 [#label_display] => hidden [#view_mode] => full [#language] => und [#field_name] => field_image_video_right [#field_type] => media [#field_translatable] => 0 [#entity_type] => node [#bundle] => scattergood_template [#object] => stdClass Object ( [vid] => 32 [uid] => 2 [title] => Welcome from Academic Dean [log] => [status] => 1 [comment] => 0 [promote] => 1 [sticky] => 0 [nid] => 27 [type] => scattergood_template [language] => und [created] => 1318097557 [changed] => 1383707576 [tnid] => 0 [translate] => 0 [revision_timestamp] => 1383707576 [revision_uid] => 4 [body] => Array ( [und] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [value] =>
When I first came to Scattergood Friends School, I wanted to talk with every faculty member. From my first moment on campus, I instantly knew that Scattergood had a  magical quality that would be difficult to define. However, through my discussions with Scattergood teachers I have come close. 
 
Hans Niehus has been teaching at Scattergood for over 25 years. In his time here, he has developed a mix of courses that students clamor to take. Some classes (such as his Logic and Critical Thinking course) have obvious real-world applications. These courses represent the pinnacle of teaching and learning and offer an answer to students and parents when they exclaim, “why can’t schools stop teaching to the test and show our children how to think?” 
 
However, I was struck by Hans’s other course offerings of fencing and juggling. When I met with Hans, I asked him about these classes. Why would juggling be important to know? His answer was remarkable. He said that his class was not about teaching juggling. “Who needs to know how to juggle?” he exclaimed. Rather this class was about teaching qualities such as resiliency and grit. 
 
For decades our small school in Iowa has been intentionally teaching grit and resiliency. These are the same qualities about which Ivy League scholars such as Angela Duckworth have recently given TED talks and written articles. 

I left that meeting feeling inspired and began to share my enthusiasm with the rest of the faculty. I was still left with the question: “why juggling?” Then I learned of Scattergood alum, John Connell. John was a student in Hans’ juggling course. While traveling around Bolivia, he followed the example of local street performers and began to use his juggling skills to support himself. In 2006, John began teaching juggling to disadvantaged Bolivian youth, improving their skill sets and providing them with greater economic opportunities. 
 
The power of a Scattergood education comes from providing students with opportunities to explore areas of interest while teaching transferable skills. Most students who leave Scattergood will not go on to start non-profit juggling schools. However, they will learn the skills necessary to persevere through challenges and the sensibilities to use their talents and knowledge to help others. 
 
I invite you to visit our school and see the difference a Scattergood education can make.

Louis Herbst
[summary] => [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>
When I first came to Scattergood Friends School, I wanted to talk with every faculty member. From my first moment on campus, I instantly knew that Scattergood had a  magical quality that would be difficult to define. However, through my discussions with Scattergood teachers I have come close. 
 
Hans Niehus has been teaching at Scattergood for over 25 years. In his time here, he has developed a mix of courses that students clamor to take. Some classes (such as his Logic and Critical Thinking course) have obvious real-world applications. These courses represent the pinnacle of teaching and learning and offer an answer to students and parents when they exclaim, “why can’t schools stop teaching to the test and show our children how to think?” 
 
However, I was struck by Hans’s other course offerings of fencing and juggling. When I met with Hans, I asked him about these classes. Why would juggling be important to know? His answer was remarkable. He said that his class was not about teaching juggling. “Who needs to know how to juggle?” he exclaimed. Rather this class was about teaching qualities such as resiliency and grit. 
 
For decades our small school in Iowa has been intentionally teaching grit and resiliency. These are the same qualities about which Ivy League scholars such as Angela Duckworth have recently given TED talks and written articles. 

I left that meeting feeling inspired and began to share my enthusiasm with the rest of the faculty. I was still left with the question: “why juggling?” Then I learned of Scattergood alum, John Connell. John was a student in Hans’ juggling course. While traveling around Bolivia, he followed the example of local street performers and began to use his juggling skills to support himself. In 2006, John began teaching juggling to disadvantaged Bolivian youth, improving their skill sets and providing them with greater economic opportunities. 
 
The power of a Scattergood education comes from providing students with opportunities to explore areas of interest while teaching transferable skills. Most students who leave Scattergood will not go on to start non-profit juggling schools. However, they will learn the skills necessary to persevere through challenges and the sensibilities to use their talents and knowledge to help others. 
 
I invite you to visit our school and see the difference a Scattergood education can make.

Louis Herbst
[safe_summary] => ) ) ) [field_bullet_list] => Array ( ) [field_image_video_top] => Array ( ) [field_image_bottom] => Array ( ) [field_image_video_right] => Array ( [und] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [fid] => 578 [title] => [data] => [file] => stdClass Object ( [fid] => 578 [uid] => 10 [filename] => Louis pic.jpg [uri] => public://null/Louis pic_0.jpg [filemime] => image/jpeg [filesize] => 33847 [status] => 1 [timestamp] => 1373297766 [type] => image [metatags] => Array ( ) [rdf_mapping] => Array ( ) [entity_view_prepared] => 1 ) ) ) ) [field_pdf] => Array ( ) [field_image_video_top_large] => Array ( ) [field_image_bottom_large] => Array ( ) [field_image_video_right_bottom] => Array ( ) [field_image_video_right_middle] => Array ( ) [metatags] => Array ( ) [rdf_mapping] => Array ( [rdftype] => Array ( [0] => sioc:Item [1] => foaf:Document ) [title] => Array ( [predicates] => Array ( [0] => dc:title ) ) [created] => Array ( [predicates] => Array ( [0] => dc:date [1] => dc:created ) [datatype] => xsd:dateTime [callback] => date_iso8601 ) [changed] => Array ( [predicates] => Array ( [0] => dc:modified ) [datatype] => xsd:dateTime [callback] => date_iso8601 ) [body] => Array ( [predicates] => Array ( [0] => content:encoded ) ) [uid] => Array ( [predicates] => Array ( [0] => sioc:has_creator ) [type] => rel ) [name] => Array ( [predicates] => Array ( [0] => foaf:name ) ) [comment_count] => Array ( [predicates] => Array ( [0] => sioc:num_replies ) [datatype] => xsd:integer ) [last_activity] => Array ( [predicates] => Array ( [0] => sioc:last_activity_date ) [datatype] => xsd:dateTime [callback] => date_iso8601 ) ) [name] => avi_admin [picture] => 0 [data] => b:0; [entity_view_prepared] => 1 ) [#items] => Array ( [0] => Array ( [fid] => 578 [title] => [data] => [file] => stdClass Object ( [fid] => 578 [uid] => 10 [filename] => Louis pic.jpg [uri] => public://null/Louis pic_0.jpg [filemime] => image/jpeg [filesize] => 33847 [status] => 1 [timestamp] => 1373297766 [type] => image [metatags] => Array ( ) [rdf_mapping] => Array ( ) [entity_view_prepared] => 1 ) ) ) [#formatter] => media [#sorted] => 1 [0] => Array ( [file] => Array ( [#theme] => image [#path] => public://null/Louis pic_0.jpg ) [#pre_render] => Array ( [0] => _field_extra_fields_pre_render ) [#entity_type] => file [#bundle] => image [links] => Array ( [#theme] => links__file [#pre_render] => Array ( [0] => drupal_pre_render_links ) [#attributes] => Array ( [class] => Array ( [0] => links [1] => inline ) ) [file] => Array ( [#theme] => links__file__file [#links] => Array ( ) [#attributes] => Array ( [class] => Array ( [0] => links [1] => inline ) ) ) ) [#theme] => file_entity [#file] => stdClass Object ( [fid] => 578 [uid] => 10 [filename] => Louis pic.jpg [uri] => public://null/Louis pic_0.jpg [filemime] => image/jpeg [filesize] => 33847 [status] => 1 [timestamp] => 1373297766 [type] => image [metatags] => Array ( ) [rdf_mapping] => Array ( ) [entity_view_prepared] => 1 ) [#view_mode] => media_original [#language] => und [#contextual_links] => Array ( [file] => Array ( [0] => file [1] => Array ( [0] => 578 ) ) ) [#weight] => 0 ) [#printed] => 1 [#children] =>
) )
When I first came to Scattergood Friends School, I wanted to talk with every faculty member. From my first moment on campus, I instantly knew that Scattergood had a  magical quality that would be difficult to define. However, through my discussions with Scattergood teachers I have come close. 
 
Hans Niehus has been teaching at Scattergood for over 25 years. In his time here, he has developed a mix of courses that students clamor to take. Some classes (such as his Logic and Critical Thinking course) have obvious real-world applications. These courses represent the pinnacle of teaching and learning and offer an answer to students and parents when they exclaim, “why can’t schools stop teaching to the test and show our children how to think?” 
 
However, I was struck by Hans’s other course offerings of fencing and juggling. When I met with Hans, I asked him about these classes. Why would juggling be important to know? His answer was remarkable. He said that his class was not about teaching juggling. “Who needs to know how to juggle?” he exclaimed. Rather this class was about teaching qualities such as resiliency and grit. 
 
For decades our small school in Iowa has been intentionally teaching grit and resiliency. These are the same qualities about which Ivy League scholars such as Angela Duckworth have recently given TED talks and written articles. 

I left that meeting feeling inspired and began to share my enthusiasm with the rest of the faculty. I was still left with the question: “why juggling?” Then I learned of Scattergood alum, John Connell. John was a student in Hans’ juggling course. While traveling around Bolivia, he followed the example of local street performers and began to use his juggling skills to support himself. In 2006, John began teaching juggling to disadvantaged Bolivian youth, improving their skill sets and providing them with greater economic opportunities. 
 
The power of a Scattergood education comes from providing students with opportunities to explore areas of interest while teaching transferable skills. Most students who leave Scattergood will not go on to start non-profit juggling schools. However, they will learn the skills necessary to persevere through challenges and the sensibilities to use their talents and knowledge to help others. 
 
I invite you to visit our school and see the difference a Scattergood education can make.

Louis Herbst